LA 509: “LANDSCAPE AS NECESSITY” FIELD STUDY

Under the instruction of Professor Julia Badanhope and Matthew Gordy, second year and Third year MLA students attended a conference in Los Angeles from September 26th to 30th. “Landscape as Necessity” is an international conference which was hosted by University of Southern California, with speakers from all over the world. They shared their perspectives and vision of landscape design, and talked about how landscape performance, natural and social values, etc. On the last day, the discussion revolved around the Los Angeles ecosystem and the transformation of the city through landscape-based approaches.

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GRADUATE LEARNING COMMUNITY (GLC), GRADUATE STUDENTS FROM ALL COLLEGE DEPARTMENTS, KICK-OFF EVENT

Studio Smash Up – the 1st event of GLC (Graduate Learning Community) took place on Wednesday, September 28th. It was hosted by the Graduate Landscape Architecture Studio. All college of design graduate students were invited. It was an opportunity to connect with students from other department and share and discuss our work. We then proceeded to the Architecture graduate studio where we had a chance to see their most recent design work.

MLA RECEPTION – FALL 2016

As is our tradition, the department hosted a welcome reception this Fall on Thursday, October 6th, at Professor Engler’s home. MLA students and LA department faculty had an opportunity to meet and welcome the new cohort. We also  welcomed our two guest lecturers from Australia, Jillian Walliss and Heike Rahmann, co-authors of “Landscape Architecture and Digital Technologies: Re-Conceptualising Design and Making.

LA 603, PERFORMATIVE LANDSCAPE STUDIO REVIEW, OCTOBER 2016

 

Framed as the interface between urban and watershed systems the studio asked students to explore how watershed processes and cultural processes intersect and create opportunities for new landscape types and forms. The site was located at the North-West edge of campus. Students pursued this project through spatial/visual reasoning rather than a more data-driven process.

The project was re-formulated as a competition of 4 teams; “entries” were judged based on their graphic presentation of the watershed/urban concepts and the design resolution.

Let’s take a look at some projects: